Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) celebrates with the fans in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Orlando Magic Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) celebrates with the fans in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Orlando Magic Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)|Associated Press
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Center of Detention: Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell tests positive for coronavirus, with assist from Rudy Gobert

Associated Press

By TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer

Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz confirmed Thursday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus, publicly saying that he is personally dealing with the pandemic that has temporarily shut down the NBA and other major sports leagues.

Mitchell is one of two NBA players to have tested positive: The other is his Jazz teammate Rudy Gobert, who was the first NBA player to test positive but has not publicly confirmed his diagnosis. A person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press on Wednesday night that the 7-foot-1 Frenchman had tested positive. Gobert's test result was the one that prompted the NBA to indefinitely suspend the season.

Mitchell's positive test was not known until early Thursday, the first full day of the NBA's hiatus. Jazz players, staff and some beat writers covering the team were tested Wednesday night in Oklahoma City, where Utah was to play the Thunder in a game that was called off moments before tip-off once word about Gobert's positive test was received.

Also Thursday, the Detroit Pistons, Boston Celtics, Washington Wizards and Toronto Raptors — teams that have all recently played against Gobert, Mitchell and the Jazz — all said that they were having some players and staff self-quarantine for as many as 14 days. The Cleveland Cavaliers, another team that has recently faced Utah, said they are not mandating quarantines yet but would if any of their players exhibit troubling symptoms.

"Thanks to everyone who has been reaching out since hearing the news about my positive test," Mitchell wrote in an Instagram post. "We are all learning more about the seriousness of this situation and hopefully people can continue to educate themselves and realize that they need to behave responsibly both for their own health and for the well being of those around them."

Gobert, it appears, was not among those behaving responsibly.

It started as a joke: Before leaving a media session at shootaround in Salt Lake City on Monday in advance of a game against Detroit that night, Gobert touched all the tape recorders that were placed before him on a table, devices that reporters who cover the Jazz were using.

"You know, there's not much we can do right now," Gobert said in that session when asked about how teams are dealing with the virus. And a minute or so later, before he ran out a side door, he touched all the recorders.

It isn't so funny now — not with two Jazz players now having tested positive for the virus, and with a league on edge. It is not known if Gobert is responsible for Mitchell contracting the virus, or vice versa.

"As a follow-up to yesterday's positive COVID-19 test, Oklahoma health officials tested all members of the Utah Jazz traveling party, confirming one additional positive outcome for a Jazz player," the Jazz said in a statement Thursday before Mitchell confirmed that he was the additional player. "We are working closely with the CDC, Oklahoma and Utah state officials, and the NBA to monitor their health and determine the best path moving forward."

For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia.

The vast majority of people recover from the new virus. According to the WHO, people with mild illness recover in about two weeks, while those with more severe illness may take three to six weeks to recover.

Gobert became the center of why the league has been shut down for the foreseeable future after he became the first positive test. Among the immediate fallout:

— Utah's game against Oklahoma City Wednesday night was canceled and the season was suspended.

— Washington, which played Utah in late February, said Thursday that it was having its players, coaches and basketball operations personnel self-quarantine for the next three to four days. The Wizards played at Utah on Feb. 29.

— Washington also played Tuesday against the New York Knicks, another recent opponent of the Jazz. The Wizards said players, coaches and basketball operations staff who have flu-like symptoms will be tested for coronavirus.

— The Raptors also said Thursday they are self-quarantining. "Our players, coaches and traveling staff have all been advised to into self-isolation for 14 days," the team said, also confirming that Toronto players had been tested.

— The Celtics said in a statement they have been constant communication with our Massachusetts Department of Public Health officials. The Celtics played the Jazz on Friday. The Celtics believe it is unlikely that anyone from the team came into contact with Gobert or Mitchell while they were contagious.

But out of an abundance of caution the Celtics are having players and staff who were in close contact with Jazz players or who traveled to Milwaukee on Wednesday to self-quarantine through the weekend. Players and staff will then be tested for the virus.

— Gobert and Mitchell shared the court with 50 opposing players in those games, plus 15 referees. One of the refs was Courtney Kirkland, who was to work th e New Orleans-Sacramento game on Wednesday that got canceled because he had been on the court with for a Jazz game two nights earlier.

— Still unknown: How many ballboys, stat-crew employees, security guards, attendants and others were exposed by being around the Jazz or Gobert in recent days. Some Jazz reporters said they were getting tested for COVID-19; at least

"I'm sure I probably had contact with him," Detroit's Langston Galloway said.

The NBA shutdown could cost teams well into the hundreds of millions of dollars depending on how long the shutdown lasts. Those teams that have faced Gobert in recent days will likely face some testing. And at least two Jazz beat writers who were tested revealed Thursday that the results came back negative.

State health labs and many commercial labs can conduct tests on mouth swabs, and health officials estimate that the system could handle about 20,000 tests per day

"It's unprecedented," Detroit Pistons coach Dwane Casey said. "I think it's the prudent thing to do. And what went on in Utah, I don't know all the information but that just shows you how fragile everything is right now."

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AP Sports Writers Howard Fendrich in Washington and Kyle Hightower in Boston contributed to this report.

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